Commissioner Responsibilities

Commissioners are district and council leaders who help Scout units succeed. They coach and consult with adult leaders of Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, and Venturing crews. Commissioners help maintain the standards of the Boy Scouts of America.

District Commissioner PatchDistrict Commissioner

Represents the district as a member of the council commissioner cabinet.
Leads the commissioner staff and does the following:

  • Identify and recruit enough of the right people as commissioners so that all Scouting units in the district receive regular, helpful service.
    • Assistant district commissioners
    • Cub Scout roundtable commissioner
    • Boy Scout roundtable commissioner
    • Venturing program forum commissioner
    • Enough unit commissioners for each to serve only three units
  • Provide opportunities for
    • Immediate commissioner orientation.
    • Frequent basic training.
    • Training topics at all monthly commissioner meetings.
    • The entire staff to attend the annual council commissioner conference.
  • Supervise and motivate unit commissioners to visit each unit regularly, identify unit needs, and make plans to meet unit needs.
  • Administer the annual commissioner service plan, which gives specific purposes for commissioner contact with units at designated times of the year.
  • Oversee the unit charter renewal plan so that each unit reregisters on time and with optimum membership.
  • Guide roundtable commissioners to ensure that monthly roundtables are well-attended, and provide practical and exciting unit program ideas.
  • Plan and preside at monthly meetings of the district commissioner staff.
  • Work with the district chair and district executive to stimulate and coordinate the work of the district (the district Key 3).
  • Help meet district goals.
  • Represent the district as a member of the council commissioner cabinet.
  • Support local and national Scouting policy and procedures.
  • Attend district committee meetings to report on conditions of units and to secure specialized help for units.
  • Promote the Centennial Quality Unit as a standard of performance and ensure, through the commissioners, recognition of unit leaders and units achieving the standards.

Roundtable Commissioner

  • Report to the district commissioner.
  • Conduct monthly roundtable meetings:
    • Develop regular roundtable plans.
    • Participate in the annual council roundtable planning conference.
    • Meet with the district executive and district commissioner to review the council’s master roundtable plan and adapt to the district plans.
    • Lead a monthly roundtable planning session.
    • Use national aids: Boy Scout or Cub Scout Roundtable Planning Guide, Roundtable Planning Sheets, Scouting magazine, Program Helps, Boys’ Life, etc.
    • Determine what contributions can be made by resource people, and arrange for their participation.
  • Recruit roundtable staff, as needed, to handle program elements, projects, physical arrangements, hosting, and participation.
  • Involve unit adults in training and roundtables.
  • Train roundtable staff:
    • Use the Boy Scout or Cub Scout Roundtable Planning Guide.
    • Working well in advance, assign specific roundtable program projects.
    • Follow through with those who have accepted assignments.
  • Promote roundtable attendance:
    • Obtain the unit commissioner’s help in bringing new leaders to roundtables.
    • Follow up on units not participating.
    • Keep roundtable attendance records and share them monthly with the district commissioner.
  • Evaluate roundtables:
    • At least twice a year appraise the effectiveness of roundtables.
    • Seek suggestions from unit leaders.
  • Attend monthly commissioner staff meetings; report on the roundtable program and attendance.

Unit Commissioner PatchUnit Commissioner

  • Report to the district commissioner or assistant district commissioner as assigned.
  • Help each unit earn the Journey to Excellence Unit Award.
  • Use the annual commissioner service plan, with its scheduled opportunities for commissioner contact with units.
  • Know each phase of Scouting and its literature. Be able to describe how each works.
  • Visit meetings of assigned packs/troops/teams/crews regularly, usually once a month.
  • Visit regularly with the unit leader.
    • Be aware of unit leader concerns and challenges.
    • Serve as the unit leader’s coach and counselor.
    • Build a strong, friendly relationship.
    • Using the literature and profile sheet, help the leader see opportunities for improvement.
    • Encourage unit participation in district and council events.
  • Work to ensure effective unit committees.
    • Visit with the unit committee periodically.
    • Observe the committee, offer suggestions for improvement, and work to solve problems.
  • See that unit leaders and den leaders have adequate training.
  • Make certain that proper techniques are used to select and recruit unit leaders.
  • Facilitate on-time charter renewal of all units.
    • Help the unit conduct a membership inventory of youth and adults.
    • Help the unit committee chair conduct the charter renewal meeting.
    • See that a completed charter renewal application is returned to the council service center.
    • Make arrangements to present the unit charter at a meeting of the chartered organization.
  • Attend all meetings of the commissioner staff.
  • Become trained:
    • Initial orientation and basic training
    • Arrowhead Honor and Scouter’s Key
    • Annual council commissioner’s conference
  • Set the example.
    • Adopt an attitude of helpfulness.
    • Keep promises.
    • Be concerned about proper uniforming.
    • Be diplomatic.
    • Be a model of Scouting ideals.
  • Know the resources available to the unit in the neighborhood, district, and council.
  • Conduct own Self-Evaluation from the Commissioner Fieldbook.